HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY

5-Star Amazon Review

Meet Me In Maine

“Elizabeth and Scarlett are young, attractive and independent women who buy a B&B in Blue Harbor Maine with romantic ideas about the quaint town and being in business for themselves. Instead, they walk into a decades-old nest of violence and prejudice, where dead bodies pile up day after day and a curse hangs over Blue Harbor like a guillotine.
An epidemic of mistrust infects the townspeople as they worry who or what the killers are and who will be the next victim of The Curse. Events stymie even the police who are ready to assess blame on the two women, without any substantive evidence. Romantic entanglements complicate every aspect of a mystery that grows deeper moment by moment.
Navigating the labyrinth of characters, clues, suspicions, frights and paranormal happenings keeps you turning the pages. Leist has created a breezy cozy mystery, a clean read that is suitable for teens and adults alike. Her writing is descriptive without weighing down the plot, and she keeps up the energy and momentum throughout. A good fun read that is very well written.”

TRANQUILITY

by zeewipark

Tranquility I seek

In the water so deep.

The moonlight’s glow,

The wave’s salty flow,

Even the whale’s blow,

Bring me to a special place,

As soothing as a lover’s embrace.

Cold fingers hold me aloft

In a bed so watery and soft.

#RRBC 30-DAY #BLOGGING CHALLENGE DAY 30

This is day 30, the last day of the blogging challenge. It has ruled my life for the past month, and I will feel lost without it. The challenge achieved its purpose: to bring back my love for writing. I haven’t written poetry or my book for the past year and needed an outlet to inspire me. Writing every day for thirty days has shown me that I can do it. And I will do it.

In my blog posts, I returned to events I remember most fondly.

Vacations with my daughters in Wildwood, New Jersey.

Vacation in Jamaica with my oldest daughter and son-in-law.

Vacation with my younger daughter and son-in-law in the Dominican Republic.

Visiting with family.

Happy days when Nounous was healthy.

People I loved and lost.

People I will never forget.

People I respect and have come to love, including the Rave Reviews Book Club members. They have become family to me, reading and responding to my long-winded posts.

Thank you, my new family, for participating in the RRBC Blogging Challenge, and a big thanks to Nonnie Jules for organizing this fantastic event.

Please visit my fellow RRBC bloggers at https://ravereviewsbookclub.wordpress.com/rrbc-member-chat/

#RRBC 30-DAY #BLOGGING CHALLENGE DAY 29

We’ve reached the homestretch of the blogging challenge. I am not a poet or claim to be one, but poetry has been an outlet for my feelings, and I will share a few with you.

 WASH AWAY MY PAIN

Please wash away my sorrow and pain.
Let it flow down the streets with the rain,
Dissolved in torrents of despair and sadness,
Joining others on their way past the madness.


The ocean may take it far away,
To places we cannot even say
,
Where no one recognizes its sting
Or knows the infliction it can bring.

Let the rain grow harder with its might,
Becoming hail on this fateful night.
I want to be free of all traces
Of unwanted feelings and faces.

My body grows cold from the rain.
I stand clean and free from the pain.
Shivers create a path down my spine
As I wait in the dark woods of pine.


I hold my head high to the wet spray.
It becomes a mist of blue and gray.
The faucet has been
turned off for the night,
Leaving me feeling clean and all right.

MURDERS AND LOVERS

I don’t need to fight the snowdrifts.

I’ll stay inside with the misfits.

The ones who prefer books

that grab you with their hooks.

The fire is getting low

as the strong winds begin to blow.

I snuggle farther beneath the covers

as I read about murders and lovers.

SOLITUDE

A rare commodity is solitude.

It can be easily misunderstood.

To be all alone with no one else around.

You can do this in the air or on the ground.

You can sail off in the blue sea,

Or hop on a plane without me.

We can all use some time alone

Without T.V. or telephone.

Time to think about your goal.

You will come back feeling whole.

A Darkness To My Soul

The black abyss grabs hold,

Taking me to its soul.

Reflections of hell and beyond,

Pushing me deep and far.

Away from the light of day,

I have no need to pray.

Take me to the bottom,

Where no human has tread.

Away from humanity and light,

I have made my dark bed.

CLOSER TO THE BLUE

Puffy clouds appear far and few

In the aqua sky, so brand new.

I sink deeper into the white sand,

My heart beats like a marching band.

If I close my eyes tight,

will I see paradise this night?

It takes me back to the time

When everything had been fine.

Fantasy, I beseech thee.

Return me so I can roam free.

Take me back to the shore.

Where I’d been happy before.

SING ME A SONG

Sing me a song.

Write a melody

Of times gone by

And moments lost in time.

Stroke the keys.

Massage the ivories.

Raise your voice high

So I can hear your words.

Words of hope and loss.

Sing them loud and clear.

Stories of faraway places

And times that are gone.

I close my eyes.

I can hear your words.

I see your fingers as they

Glide across the keys.

The words take flight.

They reverberate through time.

They leave your lips

And land on mine.

A sweet melody

To soothe my advancing years.

A pretty song

To fill my empty heart.

WHITE BLANKET

Look to the glowing skies,

Magic before my eyes.

Snow flutters to the ground

Without even a sound.

Masking the dirt with white,

So pretty and so bright.

I hope it can remain this way,

A blanket for one more day.

Thank you for joining me as I shared a sample of my poetry. I hope you enjoyed them as much as I enjoyed composing them.

#RRBC BLOGGING CHALLENGE DAY 28

I’m returning to my childhood and seeing what my tired brain can remember. It won’t give me the teachers’ names from grade school since I have always been lousy with names, but I remember the names of my classmates.

I spent kindergarten one block from my house at the local public school, which is now called P.S. 209 Margaret Mead School. I played paddle ball in the schoolyard when I was older, but the courts are gone, replaced by fake grass and running paths. My memories include the smell of Elmer’s Glue, construction paper, and the sound of kids’ voices echoing in the long hallways. Happy memories twirl around in my brain. I see flashes of my mother walking me to school, and it might have been possible that she saw enough at that age to accompany me.

For first grade, my parents sent me to Yeshiva of Brooklyn. A depressing school consisting of two houses linked by a courtyard on Ocean Parkway. We played on the strip of land between the busy street of cars and the sidewalk of houses.

Ocean Parkway was where I rode my bike when I was older. Getting back to first grade, I hated the school. They taught us English, Hebrew, and Yiddish. The teachers and students were much more religious than my family, and I felt like an outsider. I refused to learn Hebrew and Yiddish, and my parents and the school assumed I had a learning disability. It was a preview of how stubborn I can be if something goes against what I want or what is right. One teacher was so mean to me that I had nightmares of her wig getting caught on the hook above the blackboard, like a fish caught by a hook. My parents removed me from this hellhole, and I was sent to Yeshivah Ohel Moshe.

I found this picture on Google, and Ohel Moshe hasn’t changed.

I see a traffic light has been installed. A good idea since I had to run across the busy street to catch the public bus. Did I mention I had to take two buses each way for 6 days a week? We had Sunday school. I waited forever for the buses in the rain and snow, and the commute took over an hour. We had school buses through 4th grade and then public transportation. I was proud of my bus pass. Yes, I’m one of those parents who told their children about their long trek when they complained about walking a few blocks to school.

“Yeshiva Ohel Moshe is a Bensonhurst-based, Orthodox elementary school that was opened in 1927. Under the leadership of the late Rabbi Eliyahu Machlis, Yeshivah Ohel Moshe was known for its “Open Door” policy when accepting students and congregants alike.” Wikipedia

I guess its open-door policy allowed me to attend. As soon as I switched schools, I did well and was at the top of my class, where I competed with the cute boy I liked. Our classes were small; we had 12 gives and close to 20 boys. The size fluctuated each year. We gained students after a public school strike, and many kids stayed after the strike finished. The school was religious but more lenient than the other school.

There was little bullying, except for one boy who looked dirty all the time, so people called him Shmutz, which means dirt in Yiddish. I refused to bully anyone and stood up to anyone poking fun at someone. I refused to call him Shmutz, even to my friends, until he got angry one day when I tagged him out in punch ball, ramming me into the fence. My finger got big and swollen. When I found out it was broken, Shmutz got in trouble. He never apologized but gave me ‘dirty’ looks, deserving the nickname.

My high school years were spent at Yeshivah University H.S. for Girls. I didn’t want to attend a girls’ school, but Yeshiva of Flatbush was too expensive, even though I got in. I met the snobby girls who later moved to Long Island and didn’t bother to acknowledge me. Not all the girls thought the world revolved around them, and I made good friends.

Do I see any of these friends? No. It wasn’t easy going to Yeshivah with all the restrictions, and I was happy to graduate and begin my life. I attended Boston University for a year, then switched to New York University, where I graduated. Later, I received an M.B.A. in Finance from Baruch College. I didn’t enjoy learning until my college years. I’ve always loved reading, but college opened new doors for me.

New York University is a quaint college in a bustling city. I had to commute by train, but it was worth the trip.

#RRBC 30-DAY BLOGGING CHALLENGE DAY 27

Windsor Castle is an authentic castle snuggled next to a quaint village where you can stop for a drink and shop. Yay!

I loved the turrets. All the castle needed was a moat, but I didn’t see one. Wait. Is that a moat?

I loved the grounds. I was searching for any jousting, but there was only one tent.

I was excited to see the inside.

The rooms were as large and ornate as Buckingham Palace. The one that stuck in my memory was the enormous dining room. I couldn’t find my picture, so I found one online that shows the over-the-top furnishings.

Look at the colorful village nestled outside the castle walls, with seats. I could spend my day watching people instead of trudging through the old rooms.

A spot of tea for anyone? I had coffee since I’m too American.

Thank you for following along on my European vacation. I’ve visited one city in one country and hope to see many more.

#RRBC 30-DAY BLOGGING CHALLENGE DAY 26

A trip to England isn’t complete without a visit to Buckingham Palace. The train stop was on the opposite side of a vast park we had to cross to reach the palace. The path took us through a lot of greenery and many tourists taking pictures. Finally, we reached the palace gates.

The inside was magnificent, each room ornately furnished. The tour guide handed us headphones for the walking tour, and we put them on. Once we heard Prince Charles’ monotonous voice, I roamed the rooms with my daughter, leaving my husband and the headphones behind.

Most rooms were gloomy, and we were eager to see the grounds.

We followed the others from one overfurnished room to the next. Roped off and behind the glass were memorabilia of the monarchy.

Endless objects and clothing from the past. I’d never make a good historian.

Then we were allowed on the grounds the royal family used when they were in residence. The grass was roped off, and we were confined to the path; no wandering around for us.

Kensington Palace had better grounds to roam. However, I wasn’t impressed with the building’s small dark rooms. The Palace I liked the best was Windsor Castle, and we’ll visit it in my next article.

Kensington’s grounds were much more cheerful than the inside.

There was a maze outside, but we (or I) were too tired.

I’ve read travel brochures, but none tell you if a place is boring or worth the trouble. Since I’m adept at complaining wherever I go, I wonder if there’s a need for a ‘Is It Worth the Effort’ brochure? I would place Kensington Palace in the not worth it category.

#RRBC 30-DAY BLOGGING CHALLENGE DAY 25

Since I had so much fun at London Tower (do I detect a drop of sarcasm?), I thought I’d continue my London adventure. A trip to Harrods, London’s famous department store, is worthwhile. We took the Underground. If anyone mistakenly believes New York subways have the most aggressive people, I’m sorry to say London’s Underground passengers will push you over and stomp on you. With my swollen legs, I prayed each time to reach my destination in one piece. I did much better on the buses.

My daughter is the happiest while shopping.

We had a great day shopping.

Our next fun shopping trip was to Covent Garden.

I love quaint places and shopping. With two daughters, the highlight of our trips always centered around shopping. Life wasn’t complete until I bought a handbag on a trip, and I scored a Burberry bag in London.

We adored the crafts market and even found a kosher falafel place. Kosher food was harder to find in London than I expected. One neighborhood had a variety of places, but there were few kosher restaurants outside this area. To locate the kosher takeout in the food court of a department store, we asked many employees who had never heard of it. Finally, one store employee heard of the vendor and told us where to find it. We almost didn’t have food for the Sabbath.

We found the cutest pastry shop in Covent Garden, hidden behind a door, where everything was small, like in Alice in Wonderland.

I lost weight on this vacation with all the walking we were doing and the lack of kosher food. Now I know why some friends stick kosher salamis and peanut butter into their checked luggage. I didn’t want to walk around London smelling like salami and peanut butter. Next time, I will plan better for a vacation abroad. My husband suggested Venice, but after researching the food options, I knew I needed more time to prepare for that trip since even the milk and bread in Venice have lard and must be kosher. Packing a bag and going anywhere without worrying about food would be nice.

#RRBC BLOGGING CHALLENGE DAY 24

Today I’ll continue with my European vacation to London, England. Since we booked in a hurry, I realized afterward that we missed great sites in London and the surrounding suburbs. I hope there will be a next time.

I’ll begin with London Tower, which I found to be a creepy place.

I had an eerie feeling stepping inside, and it wasn’t because of the long lines.

We step inside; it’s dark and gloomy.

We are welcomed by statues wearing armor; even the horses have armor.

If I wanted to leave, would they come alive and stop me? I told myself it was my claustrophobia rearing its ugly head.

Did I hear a neigh from that horse? It was looking straight at me. I turn around and almost bump into this big guy.

Is that a face beneath the helmet?

The guide for London Tower (of hell, I added that) takes us to a staircase, which we climb, and then to a much narrower staircase. I have a bad feeling. We climb a bunch of steps, and I have trouble breathing. This isn’t Israel again. Once the tour guide tells us the passageway will get narrower, I respond I’m leaving. He gives me a strange look and says I must climb them to see the tower. I’m already pushing the annoyed tourists. I hear my husband grumbling behind me. My daughter doesn’t care since she also hates tight spaces.

Once we leave the hole in the wall passageway and reach the light, which is the semi-darkness of the main area, a special guide escorts us since we are not allowed to walk around by ourselves. We wait for the rest of our group and join them to see the monkey statues outside. I’m not a monkey fan, but I hate those monkeys. They remind me of the flying monkeys from the Wizard of Oz that still gives me nightmares.

Afterward, we were allowed to leave London Tower. I was never so happy to leave a tourist site, and this place is not on my recommended sites to see.

#RRBC 20-DAY BLOGGING CHALLENGE DAY 23

One of my favorite vacations was with my daughter, Ashley, and my husband in London, England. It was June years back, and my husband said let’s go to London in August. I feared it wasn’t enough time to make plans and book hotels and flights, but we had promised Ashley a European vacation instead of a Bat Mitzvah, and I wanted to take her before she graduated college, so I agreed. I yearned to see Paris, but my husband was leery because of the unfriendliness American tourists encountered there. Thinking back, I regret not visiting Paris since it was only a boat ride away.

This is our hotel according to their brochure: “Situated in the heart of London on the bank of the River Thames, Plaza on the River provides 90 generously sized suites with exquisite views of the Houses of Parliament and Big Ben. A short walk from Vauxhall Station, our South Bank hotel puts guests within easy reach of the famous West End, the financial district, Westminster Abbey, the London Eye, Tate Britain, and other beloved attractions.” 

In reality, to reach Westminster Abbey and the other sites, there is a long walk to a bridge and then more of a walk once you cross it. It would have been much easier if we had stayed on the other side. Since we didn’t book a tour, we spent time on buses and trains.

Ashley was with me, so it was worth the swollen legs and feet. Lymphedema and walking don’t go hand in hand.

To see London’s sights, we walked across this small bridge. We were on the same side as the London Eye but never made it there.

Ashley at Westminster Abbey on our walk. Behind her, there’s a statue of a man riding a horse.

Wherever we went, there were statues. Some elaborate and a few strange ones.

The statues served as great rest stops on our walking tours. The gold one was near Buckingham Palace.

I believe the goat statue stood in the quaint town near Windsor Castle.

We walked passed this statue on our walks across the bridge.

This statue gave me a good laugh since it stuck out like a sore thumb among London’s serious architecture and sculptures. I never learned the purpose of the blue rooster. Was it the year of the blue rooster somewhere?

The following two pictures are of sculptures at the London Tower. I’ll share photos of the London Tower in my next post. I found so many images of statues in my album that I wanted to share them separately.

Does London have a statue fetish? I only visited a few sites but found more statues than anything else. I’ll let you be the judge.